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function (poly AND iso)morphism and variable inheritance.
#11
Code:
Then blah(i).blah2(j) != blah(j).blah2(i).

just in case anyone is unfamiliar with the notation...

!=

means "NOT EQUAL" in the logical (as opposed to bitwise) sense.

Cheers
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#12
[quote]
The advantage is that it can be accessed differently for people with different styles. Take another example in qb4.5:

Code:
CALL sub1(blah%)
sub1 blah%
[code]
[/quote]

I think you are streching the definition of isomorphism a bit too far. You need to be able to show some form of one to one correspondence between the two. Simply have two ways of acheiving the same thing isn't isomorphism, otherwise all languages have isomorphism:
[code]
a = b;
a = b + 0;
a = b + 1 - 1;

Are all mathmatically equivalent, but I dont think it is correct to say each of these is isomorphic.
esus saves.... Passes to Moses, shoots, he scores!
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#13
Again, let me rephrase. They compile to the same code, thus they are isomorphic.

In your example, I imagine a good compiler would compile to the same code too.
Peace cannot be obtained without war. Why? If there is already peace, it is unnecessary for war. If there is no peace, there is already war."

Visit www.neobasic.net to see rubbish in all its finest.
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#14
Quote:blah(i).blah2% = blah.blah2%(i)

This is the statement thats going to create horrible confusion.
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#15
Only if it's not read carefully. =( Already did cause horrible confusion. (glares menacingly @ LooseCaboose)
Peace cannot be obtained without war. Why? If there is already peace, it is unnecessary for war. If there is no peace, there is already war."

Visit www.neobasic.net to see rubbish in all its finest.
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#16
Yeah thats my point. Very few people in the world actually look carefully.
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